What is the best way to strip paint off of a brass HO scale model train locomotive?

I recently aqcuired some brass HO scale engines. I have never had brass, and the paint schemes that the previous owner had do not match my era. How do I strip the paint effectively without obviously damaging anything? Thanks!
Now, is there anything that I can use to dip the shells with? There are alot of small detail pieces, and rubbing them is not going to work as the small parts will most likely break or bend. I do not know what kind of paint it is either. I would think that there has got to be something that I can use just to dip the shells??

I’ve heard of people dipping the model into a bucket of pine-sol solution! Let it soak for a while, and watch the paint just peel off!!

This entry was posted in Questions and Answers and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to What is the best way to strip paint off of a brass HO scale model train locomotive?

  1. Steven D says:

    Do you have any idea what type of paint it is? I've used nail polish remover to remove factory paint from plastic shells but, you have to work fast because it attacks the plastic. Some recommend using transmission fluid. Brass engines are a different animal. I wish I could afford them.

    I model Transition Era myself 1948-1958
    References :
    40 years in model railroading

  2. sort187 says:

    Brasso Polish….and some elbow grease….it's a MILD abrasive, but it should help….and it won't destroy the appearance of your locos
    References :
    http://www.brassopolish.com

  3. Brent o says:

    I've heard of people dipping the model into a bucket of pine-sol solution! Let it soak for a while, and watch the paint just peel off!!
    References :

  4. bill d says:

    im not 100% on brass models, but I can tell you what I do for plastic models, a few diecasts Ive rebuilt, and 2 promos years ago

    I used to use over cleaner in the green can, i think it was called mr muscle oven cleaner, and it generally worked

    the one i use more oftern, and it works with the self etching primer i use is putting a model in a plastic shoebox, and fill over the model or pieces with brake fluid and let it sit for a day or two.

    then wash the piece off with dawn dish detergent, it breaks the grease film from either way you choose to do…… make sure you use dish gloves and a tooth brush, never do with ut gloves initially

    good luck

    bill
    References :

  5. Wdlane says:

    I have painted over 300 brass model trains in 3 scales. I own the Yahoo brass collectors group. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/brasscollectors. By far the best stripper is a blast booth with the proper abrasive grit. I use aluminum oxide 400 grit. You will probably knock some parts loose in the blast booth that will need some resoldering.

    You MUST paint immediately after blasting to get the most from the just cleaned brass.

    If you are a novice you may be better off to trade for the schemes you want, or get someone to do the job for you. I am not in the business anymore.

    Bill Lane
    http://www.lanestrains.com
    References :

  6. Pete says:

    First remove any plastic, windows, couplers, whatever else there may be. Then, hear comes the scary part, lacquer thinner. Nothing bad will happen, I’ve been doing it for years on $1000 locomotives. Put some gloves on and go at it with a toothbrush. Rinse dry and soda blast. For heavily tarnished trains I use what’s called bar keepers friend. It’s a powder that polishes and actually micro etches the brass so it gives the paint a little more to stick to. Then paint.
    Hope it helps

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *